Facebook Twitter Google +1     Admin

Resúmenes

20080523022542-ucha.blogia.png

 

Behavior Modification, Vol. 28, No. 2, 182-193 (2004)

DOI: 10.1177/0145445503259399

© 2004 SAGE Publications

http://bmo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/28/2/182

Improving Athletes' Perspectives of Sport Psychology Consultation A Controlled Evaluation of Two Interview Methods

B. Donohue University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Y. Dickens  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

K. Lancer  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

T. Covassin  Temple University

A. Hash  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

A. Miller  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

J. Genet  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Although investigations have consistently demonstrated the effectiveness of sport psychology interventions, these methods have been underutilized by athletes. In this study, 124 athletes completed the athletes' Attitudes Toward Seeking Sport Psychology Consultation Questionnaire (ATSSPCQ) and were subsequently randomly assigned to receive one of the two semistructured interview formats. One interview focused on discussing the athlete's experiences in sports, and the other focused on delineating sport psychology and its potential benefits to the athlete. Upon being interviewed, athletes were readministered the ATSSPCQ. Discussing sport psychology and its personal benefits was more effective in enhancing athletes' perception of need for sport psychology than discussing sport experiences. However, neither interview format enhanced athletes'perceptions of openness to discuss personal issues with a sport psychology consultant and tolerance of stigma associated with sport psychology consultation. Indeed, participants who received the discussion of sports intervention reported a significant decrease in personal openness to discuss personal issues relevant to sports psychology from pre- to postintervention. Intervention effects were similar for male and female athletes. Study implications and future directions are discussed in light of these results.

Key Words: sport psychology • intervention • control • motivation • consultation • enlistment

Behavior Modification, Vol. 31, No. 6, 937-957 (2007)

DOI: 10.1177/0145445507303827

© 2007 SAGE Publications

http://bmo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/31/6/937

Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the Sport Interference Checklist

Brad Donohue  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

N. Clayton Silver  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Yani Dickens University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Tracey Covassin  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Kevin Lancer  University of Nevada, Las Vegas

The Sport Interference Checklist (SIC) was developed in 141 athletes to assist in the concurrent assessment of cognitive and behavioral problems experienced by athletes in both training (Problems in Sports Training Scale, PSTS) and competition (Problems in Sports Competition Scale, PSCS). An additional scale (Desire for Sport Psychology Scale, DSPS) was developed to assess the degree to which athletes desire sport psychology assistance in areas that are determined to be problematic. Factor analysis of PSCS items reveals six factors (Dysfunctional Thoughts and Stress, Academic and Adjustment Problems, Injury Concerns, Lack of Motivation, Overly Confident/Critical, Pain Intolerance), accounting for 64% of the total variance. PSTS and DSPS items yield four factors (Dysfunctional Thoughts and Stress, Academic Problems, Injury Concerns, Poor Team Relationships), accounting for 59% and 63% of total variance, respectively. Scores from these scales demonstrate acceptable internal consistency and convergent and discriminative validity. Response patterns of SIC scales are not influenced by gender or athlete type.

Key Words: sport psychology • assessment • psychometric • consultation • attitudes

Behavior Modification, Vol. 30, No. 3, 259-280 (2006)

DOI: 10.1177/0145445503261174

© 2006 SAGE Publications

http://bmo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/30/3/259

Emotions and Golf Performance An IZOF-Based Applied Sport Psychology Case Study

Alexander B. Cohen

Gershon Tenenbaum

R. William English

Florida State University

A multiple case study investigation is reported in which emotions and performance were assessed within the probabilistic individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Kamata, Tenenbaum,& Hanin, 2002) to develop idiosyncratic emotion-performance profiles. These profiles were incorporated into a psychological skills training (PST) intervention, with a focus on three emotional dimensions, that is, arousal, pleasantness, and functionality, and several psychological strategies employed during practice and competition. Two female varsity golfers at a major Division I university in the Southeast participated in the case study during the Spring 2002 season. The PST intervention resulted in enhanced emotional self-regulation skills and improved golf performance. Directions for future research into the IZOF model and implications for practical application of the model are discussed.

Key Words: emotions • performance • sport psychology • individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF)

Adaptive Behavior, Vol. 14, No. 1, 73-95 (2006)

DOI: 10.1177/105971230601400103
© 2006 International Society of Adaptive Behavior

http://adb.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/14/1/73

Movement Models from Sports Provide Representative Task Constraints for Studying Adaptive Behavior in Human Movement Systems

Keith Davids

Chris Button

School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand

Duarte Araújo

Faculty of Human Kinetics, Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal

Ian Renshaw

Division of Sport and Recreation, Faculty of Health, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Robert Hristovski

Faculty of Physical Culture, University of St Cyril and Methodius, Republic of Macedonia

Researchers studying adaptive behavior in human movement systems have traditionally employed simplified, laboratory-based movement models in an effort to conserve experimental rigor. Brunswikian psychology raises questions over the representativeness of many of these popular experimental models for studying how movements are coordinated with events, objects, and surfaces of dynamic environments. In this article we argue that sports provide rich ecological constraints for representative task design in modeling the complex interactions of human performers with their environments. Adopting a functionalist perspective enriched by ideas from ecological psychology and nonlinear dynamics, we consider data from exemplar movement models in basketball and boxing to support this contention. We show that this preference for movement models from sports, although not completely novel, has accelerated over recent years, mainly due to the theoretical re-emphasis on studying the interaction of individual and task constraints. The implications of using such applied models of move ment behavior in studying the design of natural and artificial systems are also discussed.

Key Words: movement coordination and control • constraints • repesentative design • perception and action • degrees of freedom

Journal of Management Inquiry, Vol. 14, No. 2, 182-210 (2005)
DOI: 10.1177/1056492605275245
© 2005 SAGE Publications

http://jmi.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/14/2/182

Sport and Organizational Studies Exploring Synergy

Richard A. Wolfe University of Michigan

Karl E. Weick University of Michigan,

John M. Usher University of Lethbridge,

James R. Terborg  University of Oregon, j

Laura Poppo Virginia Tech,

Audrey J. Murrell University of Pittsburgh,

Janet M. Dukerich University of Texas at Austin,

Deborah Crown Core Ohio University,

Kevin E. Dickson Southeast State Missouri University,

Jessica Simmons Jourdan University of Texas at Austin,

A number of phenomena of interest to management and organizational scholars have been investigated within the context of sport (e.g., compensation-performance relationships, escalating commitment, executive succession, sustainable competitive advantage). The authors are unaware, however, of any systematic effort to address the rationale, benefits, and potential of conducting organizational research within sport. The purpose of this article is to investigate how studying within the context of sport can contribute to an understanding of management and of organizations with a focus on how such contribution can be achieved with creative and innovative research approaches. The authors present a general overview of the rationale for studying organizational phenomena within sport and provide a concise review of such research. With this as background, the authors discuss a number of organizational phenomena that they have studied within the domain of sport. The article suggests how organizational research might benefit by using sport as a context in ways not yet evident in the literature.

Key Words: sport • multilevel evolution • competitive advantage • stakeholder management • performance teams • organizational identification • diversity

Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 11, No. 4, 577-587 (2006)

DOI: 10.1177/1359105306065018

© 2006 SAGE Publications

http://hpq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/11/4/577

The Construction of the Adolescent Male Body through Sport

Lina A. Ricciardelli

Marita P. McCabe

Deakin University,Australia

Damien Ridge

City University, London, UK

The present study examined the role played by sport in understanding adolescent males' views about their body. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 adolescent boys aged between 15 and 17 years. An inductive thematic analysis of boys' narratives showed that sport provided adolescent males with a context for discussing their body image. Attributes which males liked about their body were synonymous with those associated with being successful at sport. In addition, sport was used as a forum for competing with other males both through playing sport and by using sport performance to make favourable social comparisons about their body size.

Key Words: adolescent boys • body image • competition • masculinity • sport

Behavior Modification, Vol. 30, No. 3, 259-280 (2006)

DOI: 10.1177/0145445503261174

© 2006 SAGE Publications

http://bmo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/30/3/259

Emotions and Golf Performance An IZOF-Based Applied Sport Psychology Case Study

Alexander B. Cohen

Gershon Tenenbaum

R. William English

Florida State University

A multiple case study investigation is reported in which emotions and performance were assessed within the probabilistic individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Kamata, Tenenbaum,& Hanin, 2002) to develop idiosyncratic emotion-performance profiles. These profiles were incorporated into a psychological skills training (PST) intervention, with a focus on three emotional dimensions, that is, arousal, pleasantness, and functionality, and several psychological strategies employed during practice and competition. Two female varsity golfers at a major Division I university in the Southeast participated in the case study during the Spring 2002 season. The PST intervention resulted in enhanced emotional self-regulation skills and improved golf performance. Directions for future research into the IZOF model and implications for practical application of the model are discussed.

Key Words: emotions • performance • sport psychology • individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF)

The Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, Vol. 127, No. 4, 174-180 (2007)

DOI: 10.1177/1466424007079494

© 2007 Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

http://rsh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/127/4/174

Review: Psychological responses to injury in competitive sport: a critical review.

Natalie Walker, PhD

University of Northampton, Boughton Green Road, Northampton, N7 8AL, UK

Joanne Thatcher, PhD

CPsychol, Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Carwyn James Building, The University of Wales, Aberystwyth, Penglais Campus, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, SY23 3FD, UK,

David Lavallee, PhD

CPsychol, School of Sport & Exercise Sciences, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK,

Research has attempted to examine the psychological impact of athletic injury to assist rehabilitation personnel when treating injured athletes. Sports trainers, sports therapists, physiotherapists, medical staff and sports psychologists should be aware of psychological factors impacting on the injury experience when involved in an athlete's rehabilitation. A number of models have been proposed as useful frameworks for investigating and describing the psychological response to athletic injury. Many researchers have relied upon applying or adapting grief and cognitive appraisal models originally derived from the clinical and stress related psychology literature in an attempt to describe the psychological response to athletic injury. This article provides an overview of these models and offers a critical appraisal of this research, specifically focusing on the grief response models and the integrated model of response to sport injury and rehabilitation. Criticisms focus on the lack of research supporting a uniformed sequence of stages as a feature of response to athletic injury. Further grief criticisms centre on the absence of denial in much of the research to date. The article then focuses on the dynamic core of the integrated response to sport injury and rehabilitation model. It is argued that the interrelationships between emotional responses, behavioural responses, cognitive appraisals and recovery outcomes are not as simple as suggested in the model.

Key Words: athletic injury • behavioural response • cognitive appraisal • emotional response • grief

Social Studies of Science, Vol. 37, No. 2, 173-200 (2007)

DOI: 10.1177/0306312706063784

© 2007 SAGE Publications

http://sss.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/37/2/173

Flopping, Klapping and Gene Doping

Dichotomies Between ‘Natural' and ‘Artificial' in Elite Sport

Ivo van Hilvoorde Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, The Netherlands,

Rein Vos

Maastricht University

Guido de Wert

Maastricht University,

The application of genetic technology seems to threaten what is considered natural in elite sport. This paper explores the role of genetic technology in elite sport and questions the significance of dichotomizing between the natural and artificial element. How do shifts in technology affect the attribution of the human element in athletic performance? To explore the attribution of human agency we compare the genetic enhancement of athletes with two other shifts of the ‘natural performance' in sport: first, the introduction of a revolutionary high jump technique, the Fosbury flop, in 1968; and, second, the introduction of the klapskate in speed skating in 1997. The three cases show that artificiality as such can hardly be a criterion for evaluating processes of innovation. The context of elite sport is itself highly artificial. Boundaries between the natural body and the enhanced body are the outcome of institutional processes of boundary work. When discussing new technologies in sport it is better to ask if athletes are still playing the same game and whether or not there are equal opportunities and an equal distribution of means for playing the game. The introduction of gene technology may result in inequalities, with great impact on the outcome of the game. This outcome may be considered irrelevant for the inequalities that the game is supposed to produce and measure. Genetic enhancement may also threaten the public view of athletes as moral agents and possibly change the appreciation for human performance.

Key Words: elite sport • Fosbury flop • gene doping • (gene) technology • klapskate • natural

European Physical Education Review, Vol. 11, No. 3, 239-255 (2005)
DOI: 10.1177/1356336X05056649

© 2005 North West Counties Physical Education Association, SAGE Publications

http://epe.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/11/3/239

Physical education, youth sport and lifelong participation: the importance of early learning experiences

David Kirk Leeds Metropolitan University, UK

The PESSCLS strategy for physical education and youth sport in England has received an unprecedented level of funding from the Blair government during its term in office. In this article, it is proposed that there are structural problems with the delivery of physical education and school sport in England that the PESSCLS strategy and associated policies such as Game Plan may not have accounted for. It is argued these problems become evident through a review of research on the importance of early learning experiences for lifelong participation in physical activity. In addition, the impact of perceptions of competency on young people's motivation to participate is discussed, prior to exploring the influence of gender, socio-economic status and sociodemographic factors on participation. Further evidence is reviewed that suggests secondary school physical education programmes have in their traditional form been ineffective in promoting lifelong physical activities. The article concludes with the identification of some alternatives to the traditional approach to PE and youth sport that could enrich some of the PESSCLS initiatives.

Key Words: early learning experiences • educational reform • lifelong participation • youth sport

23/05/2008 02:25 ucha #. sin tema

Comentarios » Ir a formulario

No hay comentarios

Añadir un comentario



No será mostrado.





La Bitácora del Dr. Ucha

Temas

Archivos

Enlaces


Blog creado con Blogia. Esta web utiliza cookies para adaptarse a tus preferencias y analítica web.
Blogia apoya a la Fundación Josep Carreras.

Contrato Coloriuris